Call for papers: Academic Labor, Research and Artistry

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Academic Labor: Research and Artistry (ALRA) is a peer-reviewed open access journal launched in 2016 by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor at Colorado State University. ALRA seeks submissions of articles on academic labor markets and labor relations, both nationally and internationally. Along with our center and website, we offer a research home for those undertaking scholarship in areas broadly defined as tenure studies and contingency studies. To meet this objective, we invite a wide range of contributions, from the statistical to the historical/archival, from the theoretical to the applied, from the social sciences to the creative arts, and from scholarship to commentary. Our editors and reviewers include social scientists, artists, and theorists specializing in academic labor issues.

We welcome scholarly articles, reports, policy proposals, position statements, essays, organizing and advocacy toolkits, photographs, photographic essays, personal narratives, social science research, original art, artifacts of curated performance art, op-eds, reviews in print and multimedia formats, etc. We also welcome histories of academic labor efforts; for instance, if your institution or program has engaged in efforts to establish or improve practices and policies and would like to have a backup location for archiving the papers, please send them our way and we will work with you on creating a secure, digital file. If you do not see a genre mentioned that you are interested in pursuing, please contact the lead editors, Sue Doe and Janelle Adsit(sue.doe@colostate.eduJanelle.Adsit@humboldt.edu).

Submissions should not exceed 10,000 words in length, including abstract, notes and citations. ALRA has no minimum required word count. Aligned with ALRA’s mission to encourage conversation among a broad range of stakeholders, we welcome shorter pieces, including briefs, on topics aligned with the journal?s mission and aims.

ALRA is interested in pieces concerning topics including but not limited to:

  • The spread of contingency and its implications for tenure and academic freedom
  • Diversity in academic labor markets
  • Hiring practices, labor policy and law in higher education
  • Women and contingency
  • Faculty retention
  • Transformative practices, advocacy and activism
  • Case studies of labor reform
  • Student labor and student faculty relationships
  • Slow professorships and influential arguments about/characterizations of faculty life