New Book: The Color of Money – Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap

By Mehrsa Baradaran. From Harvard University Press: When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1863, the black community owned less than one percent of the United States’ total wealth. More than 150 years later, that number has barely budged. The Color of Money pursues the persistence of this racial wealth gap by focusing on the … More New Book: The Color of Money – Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap

EPI: How today’s unions help working people

By Josh Bivens, Lora Engdahl, Elise Gould, Teresa Kroeger, Celine McNicholas, Lawrence Mishel, Zane Mokhiber, Heidi Shierholz, Marni von Wilpert, Ben Zipperer, and Valerie Wilson Americans have always joined together—whether in parent teacher associations or local community organizations—to solve problems and make changes that improve their lives and their communities. Through unions, people join together … More EPI: How today’s unions help working people

New Book: Understanding Global Poverty – Causes, Capabilities and Human Development

By Serena Cosgrove, Benjamin Curtis. From Routledge: Understanding Global Poverty introduces students to the study and analysis of poverty, helping them to understand why it is pervasive across human societies, and how it can be reduced through proven policy solutions. Using the capabilities and human development approach, the book foregrounds the human aspects of poverty, … More New Book: Understanding Global Poverty – Causes, Capabilities and Human Development

How “Shareholder Value” is Killing Innovation

By William Lazonick, The prevailing stock market ideology enriches value extractors, not value creators.  Conventional wisdom holds that the primary function of the stock market is to raise cash that companies use to invest in productive capabilities. The conventional wisdom is wrong. Academic research on corporate finance shows that, compared with other sources of funds, … More How “Shareholder Value” is Killing Innovation

Why current definitions of family income are misleading, and why this matters for measures of inequality

By Nancy Folbre, Researchers studying income distribution in the United States seem reluctant to acknowledge the family as an important unit of production and distribution. As a result, they often rely on statistics that provide a misleading picture of inequalities based on class, race or ethnicity, and especially gender. Incomplete definitions of both family and … More Why current definitions of family income are misleading, and why this matters for measures of inequality