New Book: All Fall Down – Debt, Deregulation and Financial Crises

By Jane D’Arista. From Edward Elgar: All Fall Down traces the ways in which changes in financial structure and regulation eroded monetary control and led to historically high levels of debt relative to GDP in both developed and emerging economies. Rising stocks of debt drove the global financial system into crisis in 2008 when households, … More New Book: All Fall Down – Debt, Deregulation and Financial Crises

Deindustrialization in the Granite State: monetary policy, financialization, & the loss of U.S. manufacturing jobs

By Marie Duggan. From Dollars&Sense: The central room is 65,000 square feet with a high ceiling. This room is noisy, with large machines emitting loud hums and whirrs. The machinists are dwarfed within the canyons between the rows of equipment. Many of the machines have plastic housings, so that each looks like a giant photocopier, … More Deindustrialization in the Granite State: monetary policy, financialization, & the loss of U.S. manufacturing jobs

New Book: The Job Guarantee and Modern Money Theory

Edited by Michael J. Murray & Mathew Forstater. From Palgrave: The contributors to this edited collection argue that a flexible Job Guarantee program able to react to an economy’s fluctuating need for work would stabilize the labor standard, the value of employment in relation to money. During economic downturns, the program would expand to provide more … More New Book: The Job Guarantee and Modern Money Theory

New Book: Advances in Endogenous Money Analysis

Edited by Louis-Philippe Rochon & Sergio Rossi. From Edward Elgar: The endogenous nature of money is a fact that has been recognized rather late in monetary economics. Today, it is explained most comprehensively by the theory of money in post-Keynesian economic analysis. This book revisits the nature of money and its endogeneity, featuring a number … More New Book: Advances in Endogenous Money Analysis

The Rise of the American Bond-holding Class

By Sandy Brian Hager, The history of class conflict, power and inequality in the United States has always been intimately bound up with the public debt. Already during the War of Independence (1775-‘83), revolutionary forces accumulated debts of $54 million, and a difficult task for the first Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, was to … More The Rise of the American Bond-holding Class