Post-Crisis Capital Controls in the Periphery – Regaining Policy Space?

By  Ilias Alami, I have made the case for thinking politically about capital controls. This is particularly important, I argued, because on one hand, capital controls tend to be portrayed even by progressive economists as ready-made, neutral, technical measures, which fulfil similar objectives irrespective of where they are implemented; and on the other, because the … More Post-Crisis Capital Controls in the Periphery – Regaining Policy Space?

Claiming Too Much for Exchange

By Bill Dunn, The theories of monopoly capitalism and unequal exchange make important contributions to economic theory. They emphasize, respectively, how big companies can use their power over consumers and smaller-firm suppliers, and how rich countries can exploit poorer ones. Capitalist exchange is not a realm of freedom and equality. However, both theories continue to … More Claiming Too Much for Exchange

Global Commodity Chains and the New Imperialism

By Intan Suwandi, R. Jamil Jonna and John Bellamy Foster (originally posted at Monthly Review), Twenty-first-century capitalist production can no longer be understood as a mere aggregation of national economies, to be analyzed simply in terms of the gross national products (GDPs) of the separate economies and the trade and capital exchanges occurring between them. … More Global Commodity Chains and the New Imperialism

The Real History of Imperialism: A Comment by James Parisot on Recent Debates

By James Parisot, The continuing debate over contemporary imperialism triggered by John Smith’s criticisms of David Harvey has been wide ranging and brought forth many important questions for 21st century global capitalism. The discussion was primarily centered around insights from Smith’s book Imperialism in the Twenty-First Century regarding questions of economic exploitation between those countries … More The Real History of Imperialism: A Comment by James Parisot on Recent Debates

The Roots of Marx’s Anti-Colonialism

By Thierry Drapeau, In his film The Young Karl Marx, director Raoul Peck features a scene where an anonymous Frenchman of African descent makes a heartfelt intervention during one of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s outdoor speeches in Paris. Contrasting with the crowd of laborers gathered around him, the elegantly dressed, top-hatted black gentleman briefly interrupts the famous … More The Roots of Marx’s Anti-Colonialism